Rabbits and Bats and Comics and things

proteesiukkonen:

I Am a Bride

A short comic inspired by Finnish werewolf folklore in which it is many times the wedding couple and/or the entire wedding party that is bewitched to turn into wolves by a resentful guest or family member.

meloromantics:

feministd1rection:

Gender roles in a nutshell: the Beauxbatons and Durmstrang entrances in The Goblet of Fire.

also, to my knowledge neither of those schools were sex-segregated in the books

shreks-swamp:

lesb0:

oceandropsandlove:

want

I would sleep in this until I got too old to climb up the ladder dead ass

sweet lord


by Mindy Lee

codywalzel:

Watercolor studies

dickraisin:

The Bat and Flash Family  ~ by EricCanete

intrikate88:

shardsofblu:

agentrromanoff:

favorite action sequences
↳ captain america: the winter soldier - nick fury is attacked

Look at this. JUST LOOK AT HOW FUCKING BADASS THIS IS.

But you still truly fear for him, because this shit happens right in the middle of a city in broad daylight, where they’re gonna riddle him with bullets and tear him into pieces. And how most people would then regard him simply as a common criminal rightfully pursued by the police, who deserved the very public execution he’s about to get.

There’s a lot to be said about how they chose the “police” machinery to take down Fury, while Steve and company was pursued by nondescript Hydra thugs and the presumably private STRIKE team. They would have absolutely no problem to murder Fury then and there, but with Steve they know they simply cannot do it when there are witnesses around.

Not here, they say for Steve Rogers. But right here and right now for Nick Fury.

And also? Before the attack, Fury sees the white cops eyeballing him in his nice SUV and says “you wanna see my lease?” This man has decades of experience in intelligence operations. He’s been lead developer on an international security-based predictive analysis program. He’s an operations mastermind. 

AND NICK FURY DOESN’T SEE THIS ATTACK COMING BECAUSE THE WARNING SIGNS LOOK EXACTLY LIKE THE AVERAGE INSTITUTIONAL RACISM HE SEES ON A REGULAR BASIS. 

sottapop:

Simple livestream doodle. Felt like drawing Robin, Nightwing, and Batman pretty much based on Phil Bourassa’s designs for Son of Batman. I took a little creative license with Robin’s cape and gave him a sword.

sottapop:

Simple livestream doodle. Felt like drawing Robin, Nightwing, and Batman pretty much based on Phil Bourassa’s designs for Son of Batman. I took a little creative license with Robin’s cape and gave him a sword.

lecteurdepaumes:

God bless

lecteurdepaumes:

God bless

pacificnorthwestdoodles:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This includes my parents. “You can lipread and talk, you don’t need to know sign language!”
Lipreading is a chore. Many people ‘forget’ I’m hard of hearing. During conversation folks turn their heads or bodies away. I can’t lipread the back of your head. People try to talk to me across the room, down the hall, or by yelling outside. If my hearing relatives learned ASL, communicating with them would have been so much easier.
Ever since I learned ASL and met other people who could sign communication has been so much easier. I can finally understand people the first time. Other hard of hearing or deaf people I have befriended have told me their families did THE SAME THING with them. Their parents often didn’t learn sign.
Not knowing sign language has made accessing the Deaf community harder because I learned ASL as an adult. As a result, my proficiency is poor and most of the people I learn from are hearing rather than deaf or hard of hearing people.
Many of my friends are also hard of hearing or deaf. Thankfully they’ve been great at helping me get up to speed. Many hearing parents and hearing relatives don’t think ASL is important. Let me tell you—IT IS.

pacificnorthwestdoodles:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

This includes my parents. “You can lipread and talk, you don’t need to know sign language!”

Lipreading is a chore. Many people ‘forget’ I’m hard of hearing. During conversation folks turn their heads or bodies away. I can’t lipread the back of your head. People try to talk to me across the room, down the hall, or by yelling outside. If my hearing relatives learned ASL, communicating with them would have been so much easier.

Ever since I learned ASL and met other people who could sign communication has been so much easier. I can finally understand people the first time. Other hard of hearing or deaf people I have befriended have told me their families did THE SAME THING with them. Their parents often didn’t learn sign.

Not knowing sign language has made accessing the Deaf community harder because I learned ASL as an adult. As a result, my proficiency is poor and most of the people I learn from are hearing rather than deaf or hard of hearing people.

Many of my friends are also hard of hearing or deaf. Thankfully they’ve been great at helping me get up to speed. Many hearing parents and hearing relatives don’t think ASL is important. Let me tell you—IT IS.